Empowering Professionals, Nurturing Learners

Webinar Archive

As a service to members, other professionals, and parents, AET hosts live webinars covering a wide variety of topics related to educational therapy. New webinars are added on a regular basis, recorded and made available to members and the public in the Webinar Archive.

Viewing Instructions

Webinars require AET Membership or a guest account to view webinars. If you are an active AET member or have already created a guest account, simply click on the green "View" button to the right of the webinar to log in.

If you are not a member and wish to create a guest login, click here.

Please note that once you purchase a webinar you may view it an unlimited number of times at no additional fee.

If you have previously purchased access to a webinar, you must log in to view it.

Look for a list of upcoming webinars on our main webinar page.



Duration: 60 minutes

In this webinar Board Certified Educational Therapist Jone Bycel will explain how educational therapists, teachers, and allied professionals can model and apply strategies to develop skills for goal setting, self-monitoring, and better comprehension.

Intentional Learning: Teaching Students to be Self-directed Learners

Presenter: Jone Bycel, MS, BCET, FAET

Intentional learners are motivated, self-directed learners who actively and strategically tackle complex material with attention to what’s working and what’s not. They develop habits of mind that result in greater understanding, retention, and application of knowledge.

So how do we develop intentional learning in our students?

In this webinar Board Certified Educational Therapist Jone Bycel will explain how educational therapists, teachers, and allied professionals can model and apply strategies to develop skills for goal setting, self-monitoring, and better comprehension.

Learning Outcomes

Participants will be able to:
  • develop thoughtful activities that enhance students’ motivation to learn, engagement, and responsibility for learning
  • describe three experiences that afford students goal-attainment opportunities
  • explain mental resources that assist students in attaining their goals

Biography

Jone Bycel, MS, BCET, FAET is a board certified educational therapist in private practice in Dallas, Texas. She has been in practice for over thirty years. She has served as a special education teacher, curriculum coordinator, educational director, dyslexia specialist, and principal and is a past president of the Dallas Branch of the International Dyslexia Association. Ms. Bycel has served on the national Board of Directors of the Association of Educational Therapists, the Advisory Board of the Dallas Branch of the International Dyslexia Association, and as an expert consultant to ldonline.org. She was previously named Special Educator of the year by both the Richardson LDA Chapter and the Park Cities LDA Chapter. The Dallas Branch of the International Dyslexia Association bestowed the Excellence in Education Award to (on?) her. Ms. Bycel frequently presents at local and national conferences. She is the author of Book-Bytes Bookmarks for High School Students and was an instructor for online classes for the Educational Therapy Certificate Program.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 66 minutes

Erin Anderson, OTR/L, will explain the how and why of sensory processing and modulation and their relationship to academic learning.

Erin Anderson

Occupational Therapy & Academics: Making the Connection

The way that individuals receive, interpret, filter, and act upon sensory information determines the impact on learning.

From difficulty with tactile sensitivity, postural challenges and fine motor skills to attention management—sensory processing and sensory modulation affect the ability of students to learn and demonstrate their learning. Occupational therapists specialize in helping children with challenges in these areas.

Erin Anderson, OTR/L, will explain the how and why of sensory processing and modulation and their relationship to academic learning.

A lively presenter, Erin provides practical, hands-on strategies that can assist students in the educational therapy setting, the classroom, and at home.

Biography

Erin Anderson graduated from St. Louis University and has been practicing as an Occupational Therapist specializing in pediatrics for almost 20 years. Erin has worked in various clinical and educational environments including her private practice, Erin Anderson and Associates, which she established in Chicago in 2004. Erin Anderson is a member of the clinical faculty at Saint Louis University. She is sought after for her experience and expertise by peers, parents and teachers in the Chicagoland area and at state and local conferences. Erin Anderson and Associates specializes in working with students with Sensory Processing Disorder, learning disabilities, non-verbal learning disabilities, Autism and developmental delay.

Learning Outcomes

Attendees will be able to:

  • State the basic tenets of sensory processing.
  • Define how sensory processing affects academic learning.
  • Assist students with sensory processing disorders to maintain optimal alertness during academics.
  • Employ effective interventions that enhance academic learning.

 

Members: $5.00
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 62 minutes

In this presentation Ross Greene, PhD will describe this powerful model for solving problems collaboratively. Particularly effective in schools, at home, and in educational therapy practice with oppositional, resistant, anxious, or acting out children, Collaborative and Proactive Solutions (CPS) focuses on learning what may be interfering and creating an undesirable behavior and then working together to find solutions.

Ross Greene, PhD

Kids Do Well If They Can: Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS)

Understanding and Helping Kids with Behavioral Challenges

CPS focuses on:

  • Solving problems rather than on modifying behavior,
  • Collaborative rather than unilateral solutions,
  • Proactive rather than reactive intervention,
  • Avoiding diagnostic categories, and
  • Providing practical, research-based tools for assessment and intervention.

Dr. Ross Greene, author of Lost at School, The Explosive Child, and Raising Human Beings, created a highly acclaimed, dynamic new way of viewing and addressing challenging behavior. In this webinar he will describe this powerful model for solving problems collaboratively. Particularly effective in schools, at home, and in educational therapy practice with oppositional, resistant, anxious, or acting out children, Collaborative and Proactive Solutions (CPS) focuses on learning what may be interfering and creating an undesirable behavior and then working together to find solutions. This approach reinforces and builds the child’s relationship and trust with the educational therapist, teacher, or parent. Dr. Greene will explain how the process works and how to implement it.

NEW! A free online pre-webinar discussion of Dr. Greene’s book, Lost At School, facilitated by Laura Doto, MA, ET/P, May 4th at 8 am Pacific. Look for a link to this interactive meeting in your registration confirmation email. Participation will be limited, so register early for the webinar to get the link. We will be discussing the introduction and chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9.

Learning outcomes
Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the six key themes of the CPS model
  • Identify and assess the various cognitive skills that are central to adaptively handling life’s social, emotional, and behavioral challenges
  • Identify and prioritize unsolved problems precipitating challenging behavior
  • List the three basic mechanisms by which adults handle unsolved problems and unmet expectations in kids (Plans A, B, and C) and what is accomplished by each
  • Describe the “ingredients” of Plan B and how to effectively implement them to solve problems, teach skills, and reduce the frequency and intensity of challenging behavior

Ross W. Greene, PhD is the originator of the innovative, research-based model of intervention now known as Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS). Dr. Greene served on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 20 years, and is now on the faculty of the Department of Psychology at Virginia Tech and on the Faculty of Science at the University of Technology Sydney in Australia. He is also the Founding Director of the non-profit Lives in the Balance (www.livesinthebalance.org), which aims to disseminate the CPS model through no-cost web-based programming; advocate on behalf of behaviorally challenging kids and their parents, teachers, and other caregivers, and encourages the use of non-punitive, non-adversarial interventions. His research has been funded by the Stanley Research Institute, the National Institutes of Mental Health, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Maine Juvenile Justice Advisory Group. He lectures and consults extensively to families, general and special education schools, inpatient psychiatry units, and residential and juvenile detention facilities throughout the world.

Dr. Greene is the author of: The Explosive Child, Lost at School, Lost & Found, and Raising Human Beings.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 72 minutes

In this presentation Sheryl Pruitt explains Theory of Mind and provides a sampling of cases, resources and strategies that can be used for improving these critical life skills.

Teaching Theory of Mind--Not Just for Autism Spectrum Discorder

Theory of Mind, the ability to recognize and understand your own perspective and the perspective of others, is often associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder. It is a skill that is frequently taken for granted in individuals who are not on the spectrum; however, people not on the spectrum can have challenges with Theory of Mind. Such challenges can have a huge impact on the way children, adolescents, and adults develop relationships with others and even their ability to get and maintain a job. Theory of Mind also affects how we think about ourselves, because our own personas are shaped by how we feel others see us. In this webinar, you will gain a broader understanding of this construct as Ms. Pruitt explains Theory of Mind and provides a sampling of cases, resources and strategies that can be used for improving these critical life skills.

Attendees will be able to:
  • Define Theory of Mind
  • Describe the impact of Theory of Mind on interpersonal relationships and future employment
  • Demonstrate how to approach teaching Theory of Mind
  • List important resources for teaching Theory of Mind

Sheryl K. Pruitt, MEd, ET/P, is the Clinical Director of Parkaire Consultants, a multidisciplinary clinic she founded to serve complex neurologically impaired individuals. Prior to the founding of Parkaire Consultants, Ms. Pruitt conducted a State of Georgia Model Learning Disability Program. Ms. Pruitt has served on boards of directors including ones dealing with Tourette Syndrome, CHADD, and the Association of Educational Therapists. She teaches a State of Georgia Professional Learning Unit Course on students with neurological impairments. Among her publications, Ms. Pruitt co-authored the books Teaching the Tiger; Tigers, Too; Challenging Kids, Challenged Teachers; and the educational chapter in the Oxford University Press medical book Tourette Syndrome. She presents nationally and internationally, and her presentations incorporate professional and personal family experiences.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 87 minutes

Join board certified educational therapist (BCET) Diana Black Kennedy to learn the symptoms and causes of math learning disabilities and their relationships with dyslexia and ADHD.

What's math got to do with?

Math Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia and ADHD: Understanding the Connections, Remediating Effectively

Do my students have a math learning disability (MLD), or do they struggle because of their dyslexia or their ADHD, or is it a mixture? How do I know? How do I best help them?

Join BCET Diana Kennedy to learn the symptoms and causes of MLDs and their relationships with dyslexia and ADHD.

Explore concept/procedure integration, explicit teaching, incremental instruction and accommodations for students with MLD. Participants will leave with guidelines and games to help all math students excel.

PARTICIPANTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Describe the neuropsychological processes involved in mathematics
  • Differentiate between domain general and domain specific causes of MLD
  • Analyze the overlaps between MLD, dyslexia, and ADHD
  • Apply an understanding of connections to a framework for remediation and accommodation
  • Analyze teaching techniques to optimize them for students

Diana Black Kennedy is a Board Certified Educational Therapist with a thriving private practice in Marin County, California. Her extensive classroom experience spans second through twelfth grade in rural, urban, and suburban settings. Her students represent a wide range of learning profiles, and she loves them all. Diana presents nationally and internationally and writes an education blog for her company, Mindspark Learning. She leads Marin’s AET Study Group and is Board Chair/Secretary for Marin Educators in Private Practice. Diana is the immediate past director and chair of AET’s Marketing and Outreach Committee and has taken the lead in organizing conversations with other BCETs about best practices for supervision.

Handout

 

Members: $5.00
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 64 minutes

Utilizing the latest research and a case study that follows a child with slow processing speed across multiple developmental stages, Dr. Ellen Braaten describes the academic, social, and emotional challenges faced by these children as they navigate the world of home, school, and community.

Living with Slow Processing Speed:

The Impact on Home, School & Social Life

How does slow processing speed affect children across their school years and beyond? What can parents, teachers, and educational therapists do to help?

Slow processing speed impacts every aspect of a child's life. Furthermore, managing a child with slow processing speed at school and at home can be challenging for teachers and parents.

Utilizing the latest research and a case study that follows a child with slow processing speed across multiple developmental stages, Dr. Ellen Braaten will describe the academic, social, and emotional challenges faced by these children as they navigate the world of home, school, and community.

From the first evaluation, to school accommodations, to the effect on family and social relationships, the webinar will explore the most common difficulties these children face in the home, in social relationships, and with school functioning. Using real-life examples, this webinar will give you insight into the challenges these children face as well as ideas on how to help.

PARTICIPANTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • list ways processing speed can affect social relationships across the lifespan
  • describe the multi-dimensional effect of a child with slow processing speed on family dynamics
  • recognize the emotional challenges (particularly anxiety) that can affect children with slow processing speed
  • outline the most recent research on the effect of slower processing speed in social and home environments and its effect on academic functioning

Dr. Ellen Braaten is the Director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) at Massachusetts General Hospital, the Associate Director of The MGH Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds and an Associate Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten is widely recognized as an expert in the field of pediatric neuropsychological and psychological assessment, particularly in the areas of assessing learning disabilities and attentional disorders. She has conducted research studies on children with nonverbal learning disabilities and attentional disorders and has published numerous papers, chapters, and reviews on ADHD, learning disabilities, gender and psychopathology, intelligence, and neuropsychological and psychological assessment of children. She is the co-author of Straight Talk about Psychological Testing for Kids, a book that has become a classic for parents and professionals. She has also written The Child Clinician's Report Writing Handbook, which has been called "the most comprehensive child assessment handbook available." In addition, Dr. Braaten published Finding the Right Mental Health Care for Your Child in 2009 and her newest book, Bright Kids Who Can't Keep Up, was published in the spring of 2014.

 

Members: $10.00
Non-members: $17.00


Duration: 53 minutes

This presentation is designed to help you build your practice and boost your case management skills.

Building a Culture of Support:

Case Management and Allied Professional Relationships

This webinar is designed to help you build your practice and boost your case management skills.

Learn how to build a network of professionals in your community that leads to effective case management in your educational therapy practice.

Lisa Brackin will discuss a philosophy and path that creates connection with the community at large in a reciprocal and mutually beneficial relationship. She will begin with self branding and professional authenticity. Then she will share methods and tools that she has found effective. Lastly, she will discuss a community of support enhances her work as a case manager.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe why self-branding is important
  • Define one's professional authenticity
  • Generate methods to support authentic relationships with allied professionals
  • Maintain long-term relationships with allied professionals
  • Apply philosophies, techniques, and methods to build a culture of support among allied professionals
  • Implement effective case management

LISA BRACKIN holds a B.A. in Elementary and Special Education, a Master's degree in Human-Development and Early Childhood Disorders, and an Educational Diagnostician Certification through Dallas Baptist University and the Texas Education Agency. She maintains a private educational therapy practice in Richardson, Texas where she has cultivated a broad professional community. She and her husband, Adam, have a 3 year old son, Ian.

Beginning with self branding and developing professional authenticity, Lisa Brackin will discuss a philosophy and path that creates connection with the community at large in a reciprocal and mutually beneficial relationship. She will share methods and tools that she has found effective and how the goal of building a community of support enhances her work as a case manager.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 72 minutes

This presentation explores the important role that executive function plays in successful learning.

Presented by Michael Greschler, M.Ed., Director of the SMARTS Executive Function programs, Research Institute for Learning and Development (ResearchILD) and Educational Specialist, Institute for Learning and Development and Kim Davis, M.Ed., Associate Director of Research and Teacher Training at ResearchILD.

Challenges with executive function impact students’ academic and social development and their overall daily functioning. This webinar will explore the important role that executive function plays in successful learning. The presenters will discuss how to assess a student’s unique areas of executive function strengths and weaknesses and will explore systematic approaches to applying executive function strategies to common academic tasks. The presenters will emphasize practical approaches that build self-understanding and self-reflection in students so that they understand how they think and learn. Both presenters are contributors to ResearchILD’s SMARTS Executive Function Curriculum.

Michael Greschler, M.Ed. is the Director of the SMARTS programs. Michael has an Ed.M. from the Human Development and Psychology program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Prior to moving to the Boston area he served as Executive Director of Legacy of Learning, a non-profit aimed at providing tutoring and supplemental academic services to economically disadvantaged and at-risk students. In addition, he is an educational therapist at the Institute for Learning and Development, working with middle and high school students on executive function and academic strategies across subject areas.

Kim Davis, M.Ed. is the Associate Director of Research and Teacher Training at ResearchILD. She is currently a doctoral student at UMass Amherst in the Research Evaluation Psychometrics program. Prior to joining the Institutes for Learning and Development, Kim served as a Test Development Manager and Content Development Consultant for Pearson’s Evaluation Systems.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 53 minutes

This presentation highlights some of the critical factors that parents and professionals who work with students who “learn differently” should take into account when guiding a student’s transition from high school to a successful college experience.

The journey to college and rich opportunities for learning success are open and available to every student. Selecting the proper path on which to travel, however, requires an evaluation of many critical factors. Imy Wax, M.S., LCPC, CEP, will highlight some of the critical factors that parents and professionals who work with students who “learn differently” should take into account when guiding a student’s transition from high school to a successful college experience.

Imy Wax is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC), Certified Educational Planner (CEP), Educational Consultant and the co-author of The K&W Guide to Colleges For Students with Learning Differences (13th edition). Currently active in both family practice and Educational Consulting, Imy travels over 75,000 miles per year visiting programs, schools, colleges and post-secondary options for children, adolescents and young adults throughout the U.S. In addition, she is the author of numerous articles in parent and professional journals, has presented at workshops both in the U.S. and abroad on a variety of topics, and has been quoted in popular magazines (The latest in The Atlantic: The Road to Higher Education With an 'Invisible Disability'. She is the founder of The Aspire Group that helps families seeking opportunities for their loved one. She believes that there should never be a “closed door” to one’s Hopes and Dreams. Each child's journey is unique to them. Success is about discovering the best and appropriate pathway on which to travel forward.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the core skills that every student needs BEFORE leaving to college
  • Identify “FUNctions” required to be successful at college
  • Understand what are the frequent “Failures”
  • Align what colleges are offering with the needs of the student
  • Differentiate the services being offered at colleges

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 71 minutes

School Trauma and the Highly Sensitive Child

While often educational therapy clients have been diagnosed with a variety of learning challenges, 12-15% of our population are sometimes mislabeled because of an innate, heightened level of sensitivity. These Highly Sensitive Children (HSC) do not have a disability, but they can be overwhelmed in school easily without our realizing it. As a result, many of these children experience subtle traumas in school that thwart learning and can complicate both family and social relationships. In this webinar, learn more about what it means to be a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) and how the school day might affect a Highly Sensitive Child.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe the characteristics of a Highly Sensitive Child, as identified by Dr. Elaine Aron, a researcher in the field of psychology for over 25 years.
  • Identify tools of Social-Emotional Learning that help HSCs better navigate academic demands and resolve social conflicts.
  • Discuss co-regulation and its role in the therapeutic alliance.
  • Describe a trauma-sensitive school and how educational therapists can a) provide a 'safe space' for HSCs and b) advocate for a supportive atmosphere in their educational and home settings.

Sandra Clifton, M.Ed., BCET, is a Board Certified Educational Therapist. After over a decade of teaching high school, she became a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) and Master Trainer at Yale University's Center for Emotional Intelligence. Formerly in New York and now in her Chapel Hill practice, she integrates tools of social and emotional learning to address the impact of anxiety, intensity, and overwhelming feelings for Highly Sensitive and Twice Exceptional individuals.

Handout
Resources

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 59 minutes

How Might We Support Agency With Design Thinking?

This introduction to Design Thinking will provide an overview of the Design Thinking process and mindsets. Participants will gain ideas and strategies for building students’ creative confidence, social-emotional skills, and self-agency.

Ellen Ellen Deutscher is a Design Thinking and Creativity Consultant with over 20 years of experience teaching public school in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is a Teacher Coach for the IDEO Teachers Guild and works as an advisor to David Kelley (founder of IDEO and the Stanford d.school) in the K12 space. In 2011, Ellen began her Design Thinking adventure at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the d.school) where she was a teacher-in-residence. Since then, she has become both a learner and leader in the world of Design Thinking and Creative Confidence. She gives talks, teaches workshops and classes at the d.school, throughout the SF Bay Area, and around the country including sessions at the 2015 & 2016 SXSWEdu conferences.

Dvora Kravitz, M.A., MFT is an Associate Educational Therapist with extensive experience as an educator. Her training and experience as a Marriage and Family Therapist provides clinical understanding and case management skills. She completed the Innovative Educators Advanced Studies Certificate, with emphasis on pedagogy using 21st century tools, and a certificate in the Orton Gillingham approach to reading remediation.

Handout
References

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 56 minutes

The Therapeutic Dimension of Education Therapy

The cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions of students' lives are complexly and deeply intertwined. Some students have suffered from traumas resulting from chronic criticisms or bullying, by shame due to their inability to meet expectations of others or themselves, or they act out their rages at a system they feel does not appreciate the difficulties they confront.

JOSEPH PALOMBO will focus on ways to address students' emotional needs to facilitate the remediation process. Specific interventions will be suggested for the development of a therapeutic environment in the relations between the students and the educational therapist that will facilitate the goal of enhancing the students' capacity to deal with these barriers to learning.

PARTICIPANTS WILL:

  • Gain an understanding of the emotional barriers that students present in the remediation process
  • Learn about the components of the relationship that are critical to the establishment of a learning alliance
  • Acquire modes of interventions that will help students overcome their emotional barrier to learning

JOSEPH PALOMBO is Founding Dean and Faculty Member of the Institute for Clinical Social Work, Chicago and the Director of its Joseph Palombo Center for Neuroscience and Psychoanalytic Social Work. He is the author of a forthcoming book titled Neuropsychodynamic Treatment of Self-Deficits: Searching for Complementarity. He also co-authored Guide to Psychoanalytic Developmental Theories and authored Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: A clinical Perspective and Learning Disorders and Disorders of the Self in Children and Adolescents.

Handout

 

Members: $5.00
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 70 minutes

Math Difficulties: Reasons and Remedies

presented by
Nancy Knop, Ph.D., ET/P
December 6, 10-11 AM Pacific
(GMT -8)

Math difficulty stems from a wide variety of causes. Dr. Knop will discuss different causes of Developmental Dyscalculia (DD), as well as difficulty stemming from a mismatch between math curriculum and brain and body readiness, including finger knowledge and visual processing, and the impact of math anxiety. How these factors interact with current changes in school curricula can make learning math challenging for many students. While fewer than 10% probably have DD, many more students have math challenges and need our help.

What steps can we take as Educational Therapists to diagnose, remediate, and accommodate these math difficulties?

This webinar will focus on and develop practical aspects of the talk Dr. Knop gave at the AET National Conference in October to help answer this question.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Explain knowledge of the brain and behavioral underpinning necessary for math learning.
  • Utilize strategies for remediating and accommodating math difficulties.
  • Discuss awareness and language to use in collaboration with students, parents, teachers and other professionals.

Nancy Knop, Ph.D., ET/P, taught science in grades 7-12 for 23 years and served in a number of leadership roles at the independent school where she taught. During those years she developed an interest in the brain and learning, earning a certificate in Educational Therapy from U.C. Berkeley Extension in 2004 with a special focus in math. In 2006 she began working exclusively as an Educational Therapist. After practicing for several years in West Virginia, she joined Summit Center in Walnut Creek, CA, where she works with students in reading and math remediation. Nancy has spoken to parents, students, teachers, and other professionals locally and at national conferences including Learning & The Brain Conferences in San Francisco, Boston, and Washington D.C., and the AET National Conferences in Boston and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Handout 1 (color)
Handout 1 (black & white)
Handout 2
References
Evaluation Survey

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 71 minutes

Special Education Law 101: A 60 Minute Special Education Law Primer

In this webinar Kaye Ragland, Ed.D., BCET, covers the basic tenets of Special Education law. Understanding Special Education law can help educational therapists, parents, and educators ensure appropriate services for children with special needs both in and out of the public school system. The history of education for individuals with disabilities in America will set the frame for the webinar. In addition to the historical context, the following concepts and more will be covered:

  • Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act (IDEIA)
  • Response to Intervention (RtI)
  • Assessment
  • Time lines
  • Eligibility
  • Section 504 of the Americans with Disabilities Act
  • Parents' Rights and Responsibilities under the law
  • How can educational therapist support parents and students in obtaining their rights under the law?
  • What is the relationship of educational therapy to public education under the law?

Handout
Evaluation Survey

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 73 minutes

Revealing Hidden Strengths: Tips to Engage and Support Struggling Learners with Superior Abilities

Cindy Hansen, M.A., ET/P, shares ways to engage and support Twice-Exceptional learners.

Students who are gifted, creative, or highly visual think deeply but often “march to a different drummer.” They are not exempt from learning challenges, however, and may appear to be inattentive, lazy, or oppositional because they struggle to follow a teacher’s expectations either educationally or behaviorally. Sometimes known as 2e students, many gifted students report feeling different, stupid, or disillusioned with school. Educators must push beyond popular myths that gifted students need little assistance to succeed, because they may still struggle in school in specific areas. Yet many of these students do not qualify for IEPs because they are passing their classes and standardized tests.

This webinar welcomes advocates, educational therapists, teachers, counselors and parents to appreciate the nuances of this special population by dispelling myths, building an understanding of their unique journey, and revealing common roots of their educational frustrations. We will evaluate collaborative educational accommodations that address learning differences and embrace the learner’s fears and desires for higher cognitive experiences.

Learner Outcomes

Upon conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to

  • Explain common myths about giftedness
  • Describe several definitions of giftedness and the concept of asynchrony
  • Recognize specific indications that a gifted learner has educational, emotional or social delays or disabilities
  • Apply higher order thinking skills while offering appropriate remediation.

Cynthia Z. Hansen, M.Ed., ET/P, is an educational therapist specializing in the unique challenges of high ability, creative, talented, and Twice Exceptional learners. She holds a Masters of Education and Teaching Certificates from UCLA and a post-masters certificate in Gifted and Talented Education from University of California Berkeley.

Handout 1
Handout 2
Evaluation Survey

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 58 minutes

When Interventions Fail: Improving Outcomes with Resistant Clients

This webinar examines the "therapy piece" of educational therapy. Dorothy Ungerleider will share techniques that probe for each client’s unique traits and interests and will show how to use them as a motivators for growth and learning. Through case examples of behavior patterns of clients who resist our best intentions and interventions, she will discuss ways of disguising "remedial services" to be more palatable through compassionate partnering and multiple forms of advocacy services. From the presenter’s work with delinquent youth, there will be a brief look at the possible causes behind the frequent co-occurrence of learning disabilities (LD) and juvenile delinquency (JD).

About the Presenter:
Dorothy Ungerleider, MA, BCET, FAET, is Founding President of AET, current Advisory Board chair, and author of Reading, Writing, and Rage, Educational Therapy in Action, and Psychoeducational Perspectives. She has lectured extensively, mentored public school teachers for the Schools Attuned program and helped develop training programs in educational therapy at UCLA and CSUN. After forming a pro bono service project at the Juvenile Justice Connection Project in L.A., she lectured to juvenile court judges about the LD/JD link and created a tool for them to use in their Bench Book for screening learning levels of adjudicated youth.

Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of power in one’s sense of self.
  • Employ the "organic curriculum" to create willingness, motivation, and trust.
  • Give examples of interventions effective with resistant clients.
  • State three outcomes of student empowerment.

Evaluation Survey
Handout 1
Handout 2

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 62 minutes

Complex Kids and Medication

In his psychiatric practice Dr. Chilakamarri collaborates closely with Educational Therapists, noting that ETs prove to be critical partners in collecting data as medication is considered and managed. This is particularly true for students who present with complex diagnoses including ADHD, anxiety, depression and learning disabilities.

In this conversation, Dr. Chilakamarri and educational therapist Laura Doto will explore new developments in medication management and discuss ways to proceed when questions arise related to medication. They will trace a case example of a student from initial inquiry through factors related to titration and side effects, while considering increasing complexity of the case. Drug interactions, primary and secondary diagnoses and pharmacotherapy will be discussed as they relate to significant exploration of family and patient history.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 75 minutes

Strategies to Get Reluctant Writers Writing (and comprehending better, too!)

Have you faced a child who hates to write? Maybe she fits a pattern typical of dyslexia, but maybe not. Some students read fine, spell well and get grammar, but blanch when you ask them to write. For some kids, nothing is scarier than an open-ended writing assignment. Still others write the bare necessity but do anything to avoid filling in details. In this presentation, Diana will explore different profiles of reluctant readers and offer hands-on, easy-to-implement, fun ways to get those reluctant writers writing.

Diana Black Kennedy, MA, BCET, is a Board Certified Educational Therapist in San Anselmo, California. She has an extensive and diverse teaching background that spans second grade through high school. She enjoys working with students with a wide array of learning needs including students with learning disabilities and students who are gifted and talented. Diana holds a Certificate in Educational Therapy, a Master's Degree in Elementary Education, and a second Master's Degree in English Literature. She presents across the country and internationally. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Association of Educational Therapists (AET) and the Marin Educators in Private Practice (MEPP) and writes a blog about education at www.MindSparkLearning.com.

Attendees will be able to:

  • describe the processes involved in writing and their neurobiological bases.
  • recognize the four major groups of reluctant writers.
  • create and/or implement appropriate remediation for all four groups.

The handout for this webinar is available here.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 60 minutes

Recognizing and Supporting Students with Nonverbal Learning Disorders, Part 2

Do you know these children?

  • Emily is 7 years old and is frequently described as clumsy - her balance and coordination seem off. She learned to read easily but her handwriting is very wobbly and doesn’t stay within the lines. She is having difficulty making friends since she doesn’t seem to recognize others’ social cues. New situations jar her. What’s going on?  Could it be ASD?  Sensory processing?  Dyspraxia? Immaturity?

Individuals with a Nonverbal Learning Disorders (NVLD) are often mislabeled, misdiagnosed, and generally misunderstood.  In this webinar, based on their outstanding presentation at AET's 2015 National Conference, educational therapists Marion Marshall and Dianne Matthaei and occupational therapist Rebecca Schatz will clarify many  misunderstandings and describe ways to intervene that yield successful outcomes.  The presenters are contributors to the book, Treating NVLD in Children: Professional Collaborations for Positive Outcomes.

Part 2: Strategies for Successful Outcomes
In Part 2 Marion Marshall, BCET, defines guiding principles for the educational support of individuals with NVLD and provides many specific strategies to improve reading comprehension and writing skills for these students.

Dianne Matthaei, ET/P, explains why mathematics is often so difficult for students with NVLD and describes strategies to improve math vocabulary, calculation skills, and understanding of math concepts.  

Marion Marshall, M.A., BCET, FAET, is an Associate Professor at Holy Names University in Oakland, CA and the Director of their Educational Therapy Certificate Program. Previously she was the Clinical Director of the Raskob Learning Institute. She is an award-winning educator who has taught in public and independent schools and has been an educational therapist for the past 20 years. She is a frequent presenter at regional, statewide and national conferences.


Dianne Matthaei, MEd, ET/P, has been an educational therapist in private practice for the past 20 years. Her business, Lighthouse Learning, LLC, provides assessment and instruction for atypical learners of all ages. She has also served as the Differentiated Learning Support Specialist and mathematics teacher for the Annie Wright Upper School in Tacoma, Washington. As an educator recognized for excellence in teaching and the parent of two atypical learners, Dianne provides workshops for teachers, therapists, and parents alike.


 

Members: $5.00
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 69 minutes

Recognizing and Supporting Students with Nonverbal Learning Disorders, Part 1

Do you know these children?

  • Emily is 7 years old and is frequently described as clumsy - her balance and coordination seem off. She learned to read easily but her handwriting is very wobbly and doesn’t stay within the lines. She is having difficulty making friends since she doesn’t seem to recognize others’ social cues. New situations jar her. What’s going on?  Could it be ASD?  Sensory processing?  Dyspraxia? Immaturity?

Individuals with a Nonverbal Learning Disorders (NVLD) are often mislabeled, misdiagnosed, and generally misunderstood.  In this webinar, based on their outstanding presentation at AET's 2015 National Conference, educational therapists Marion Marshall and Dianne Matthaei and occupational therapist Rebecca Schatz will clarify many  misunderstandings and describe ways to intervene that yield successful outcomes.  The presenters are contributors to the book, Treating NVLD in Children: Professional Collaborations for Positive Outcomes.

Overview and Motor & Sensory Aspects
In Part 1 educational therapists Marion Marshall and Dianne Matthaei will provide an overview of NVLD including the strengths, deficits, and developmental markers of NVLD over time. They will detail what NVLD is and what it is NOT.


Occupational therapist Rebecca Schatz, OTR/L, will describe the motor and sensory assessments, interventions, and home and classroom accommodations for students with this disorder and provide an in-depth look into an individual’s sensory processing profile. 

Marion Marshall, M.A., BCET, FAET, is an Associate Professor at Holy Names University in Oakland, CA and the Director of their Educational Therapy Certificate Program. Previously she was the Clinical Director of the Raskob Learning Institute. She is an award-winning educator who has taught in public and independent schools and has been an educational therapist for the past 20 years. She is a frequent presenter at regional, statewide and national conferences.


Dianne Matthaei, MEd, ET/P, has been an educational therapist in private practice for the past 20 years. Her business, Lighthouse Learning, LLC, provides assessment and instruction for atypical learners of all ages. She has also served as the Differentiated Learning Support Specialist and mathematics teacher for the Annie Wright Upper School in Tacoma, Washington. As an educator recognized for excellence in teaching and the parent of two atypical learners, Dianne provides workshops for teachers, therapists, and parents alike.


Rebecca Schatz, MS, OTR/L, is a pediatric occupational therapist. During the past 20 years she has worked in Israel and Chicago. Currently she practices in Chicago where she works exclusively with children with sensory processing disorders, learning disabilities, and pervasive developmental disorders. She consults and provides training for elementary school teachers in motor skill development and sensory integration techniques to use in their classrooms and leads parent discussion groups to enable parents to incorporate appropriate therapy ideas at home. 


 

Members: $5.00
Non-members: $10.00


Duration: 63 minutes

Mood Disorders in School: Reshaping Best Practices for Clinicians and Classrooms, Part 2

Mood Disorders in School: Reshaping Best Practices for Clinicians and Classrooms, Part 2

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 55 minutes

Mood Disorders in School: Reshaping Best Practices for Clinicians and Classrooms, Part 1

Mood Disorders in School: Reshaping Best Practices for Clinicians and Classrooms, Part 1

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 73 minutes

Starting on the Right Foot: Embracing the Challenges of a New School Year

Starting on the Right Foot: Embracing the Challenges of a New School Year is a webinar presented by the Association of Educational Therapists featuring Marydee Sklar, Susan Micari, BCET and Laura Doto, ET/P.

Do you know students who… * become disorganized when school-life demands are complex?
* have time-challenges?
* can’t keep track of assignments and materials?
* struggle to find their footing at the start of each new grade?

Juggling organizational and time demands can be tough. Learn how to... * prepare students for the challenges of a new grade.
* understand the emotional and executive functioning demands of transitions to new school demands. * explore conversation starters to help students mitigate tension. * identify tools to support external tracking of time, materials and cognitive space.

Get answers that can give rise to new strategies and better outcomes as the school year begins.

MARYDEE SKLAR is an educator who has helped families and individuals overcome struggles with time management for more than 20 years. She offers courses in Portland, Oregon and online. She teaches workshops on executive functions for professional and school communities. She is the creator of the Seeing My Time® program and is the Amazon best-selling author of three Seeing My Time books. Her latest book is for parents: 50 Tips to Help Students Succeed: Develop Your Student's Time-Management and Executive Skills for Life. For more information about Marydee visit her website http://executivefunctioningsuccess.com/.
SUSAN MICARI, M.S.Ed., BCET, is a Board Certified Educational Therapist in private practice in New York City. She works with children and adults who have executive function disorders, non-verbal learning disorders, and language-based learning disabilities. In addition, she coaches executives with ADHD and learning issues and helps college students find the right schools and develop the study skills to succeed in college. Susan writes about learning issues for periodicals such as Dyslexia Discourse and the Educational Therapist Journal. For more information about Susan visit her website http://www.susanmicari.com/
LAURA DOTO, MA, ET/P is an educational therapist in private practice in the Chicago area. Laura works with students of all ages and specializes in working with medical students with learning challenges.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 59 minutes

Adventures in Neurodiversity: Think and Teach Like an Educational Therapist

Adventures in Neurodiversity: Think and Teach Like an Educational Therapist is a webinar presented by Diana Black Kennedy, M.A., ET/P for the Association of Educational Therapists in May 2015.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE


Duration: 40 minutes

Educational Therapy: What It Is and How It Works

This video is of a webinar presented by Dorothy Ungerleider, M.A., BCET, FAET, founding president of the Association of Educational Therapists and author of Educational Therapy in Action: Behind and Beyond the Office Door and of Reading, Writing, and Rage. The webinar took place on December 3 and 4, 2014.

 

Members: FREE
Non-members: FREE